Capital Health in Halifax updates look and adds features

by Denise Bonin Friday, November 30, 2012 10:18 AM

It started with a simple request… “Could you help us add permalinks to our web Catalogue textbase records?”, but it ended with 3 new textbase interfaces, an ordering cart, a mobile interface, the ability to add records to RefWorks and, of course, permalinks.

At the beginning of this project with the Capital Health Library, it was quickly determined that, given the age of the current web-interface, adding permalinks to the records could only be accomplished using canned searches with rather long URLs.  That was rejected and a discussion ensued that resulted in the addition of many new features to the site.

Out with the old and in with the new. We started with the backend by revising the textbase data structures and ditching a bunch of unused fields and forms for the Catalogue and Pamphlets textbases.  The Catalogue had a separate interface for journal check-in and item ordering, which was also revamped.  Using the Andornot Starter Kit for Inmagic’s DB/TextWorks, we were able to provide nice clean desktop screens with a minimal number of forms, including a couple of links to saved sets from the menu screen, e.g. new catalogue items added in the past 30 days.  Given that the Capital Health library staff were already familiar with the Inmagic DB/TextWorks program, it was not a big jump to start using these new desktop interfaces and they adapted quite quickly. 

Screen shot of Pamphlets textbase search resultsMore clean up and integration. The web-interface overhaul followed using the Andornot Starter Kit for Inmagic’s WebPublisher PRO.  This included new search screens, brief report forms, and full display forms with “see also” links and Permalinks for the Catalogue, Journals and Pamphlets interfaces.  All of which was nicely integrated into the Capital Health Library website template.  Google book covers and links to Google Books were made available on both report and full display forms in the Catalogue.  Users of both the Catalogue and the Pamphlet textbases now have the ability to add items to a cart, for ordering, and/or Email, Save and Print.  In addition, within the interfaces, users can also link to selected websites, e-books, e-journals or to in-house PDF files.  Quick links to the other textbases and back to the Library website are readily available on every page.

Go-small-and-go-home. Why not let the users have access to the systems wherever they are located, even if it is on the bus, in the hospital, or at home?  Using the mobile version of the Andornot Starter Kit, we added a couple of mobile interfaces.  These included the Catalogue textbase as a whole, with all its links to e-books, e-journals, Google Books, websites, etc. as well as a separate journal subset.

Screen Shot of Catalogue textbase of RefWorks LinkResearch counts. A slight delay in the launch occurred when it was discovered that RefWorks was a big part of the Capital Health library world, but that it took about 10 steps to implement this in order to get catalogue records into RefWorks.  Some coding later and we were able to add the RefWorks feature to the Email, Save and Print portion of the cart allowing a much smoother path from catalogue to bibliography.

“We got much more than we expected when we asked about Permalinks! We now have an ordering system for our patient pamphlets, a direct-to-RefWorks button and mobile-ready search pages for our catalogue and our journals. All of this is based on the Inmagic software that our staff know so well. Andornot worked with our Information Technology department to get us to a new level of service. The look and feel is close to what our users know, so there is limited change for them, but behind the scenes, we now have more searchable fields, simpler systems, and, of course those Permalinks! All in all, an excellent experience!”
Penny Logan, Capital Health Manager Library Services

Future ready. With all these new features now in place the library is well positioned to move into the future, providing the Capital Health staff with an abundance of new information access options. 

Ronald McDonald in the Library

by Denise Bonin Tuesday, October 30, 2012 10:34 AM

RonaldMacDonaldFaceFramedThe PG Family Resource Library in the Maternal Child Department at the University Hospital of Northern British Columbia was established with the generous donation from the Ronald McDonald Children’s Charities and provides access to a large number of materials about child health issues. The resources cover topics such as ADHD, bullying, dyslexia and Tourette's syndrome. 

Anne Allgaier, the British Columbia Northern Health Regional Librarian, included the bibliographic records for this collection of over 230 books and DVDs in her current library catalogue, and has also made them available on the library website. Users can search the catalogue database for just the Family Resource portion of the collection or chose from a list of topical searches on a webpage with a fun image of Ronald MacDonald in the background. 

Once the topic link is clicked, the user can see a list of items, with details about the item.  Most of the records for the books include book cover images, which link to Google Books for even more information about the resource and the ability to purchase, if desired.  Users can also add the items in their search results to a list and order them from the library. 

The Northern Health Regional Library has been a long time user of Inmagic DB/TextWorks as well as WebPublisher PRO software.  Their website is hosted by Andornot and the canned searches were designed using the Andornot Search Cannery Wizard

Anne says, “The images and links to the Family Resource Library will facilitate access to the resources for the patients and their families in the UHNBC Maternal Child department. The materials can all be borrowed and library staff will also help with accessing information not available in the Family Resource Library.”

“Thank you to Andornot for creating the special page for this unique collection.”

Parents and children in Prince George and indeed the whole Northern Health Region, will be delighted to have Ronald McDonald guide them through these wonderful resources. 

Canadian Medical Association Develops New PTMA PolicyBase

by Denise Bonin Monday, September 17, 2012 11:49 AM

PTMAQuickSearchPageProvincial and territorial medical associations (PTMA) in Canada set policies on various issues such as emergency room overcrowding, nurse practitioners, electronic medical record keeping, prescription drug usage, etc. for their particular jurisdiction. The Health Policy and Research (HP&R) department of the Canadian Medical Association (CMA) was asked to create a repository of these policy documents and make them available to all PTMAs. The library was already managing a database of CMA policies and was asked by HP&R to set up a similar database for the PTMAs.

Andornot worked with the CMA library team, led by Reference Librarian Elizabeth Czanyo, and the association’s IT department, to set up a password protected database using the Andornot Starter Kit (ASK), DB/TextWorks and WebPublisher PRO, with the following features:

    • Full text document searching and display
    • Link to PDF document
    • Referring URL security
    • Email, Save and Print cart
    • Permalinks to each policy
    • Search, display and cart all in same template
    • Bilingual: English and French
    • Search result sorting by Title, Date and PTMA Author

Now researchers at each PTMA can access and compare policies from various jurisdictions, assisting them in the creation of their own policies.

Elizabeth Czanyo says, “I think the database will be a useful tool for our provincial partners, and help them collaborate in policy creation across the country. Working with Denise Bonin and her team at Andornot was great – they were fast, professional and really knew their stuff!”

Information Concept Architect – do you qualify?

by Denise Bonin Sunday, March 25, 2012 11:18 PM

Quite a few years ago my husband and I went out to one of the fanciest restaurants in Vancouver – at the time - and dropped way more money than we expected.  The meal consisted of small quantities of beautifully arranged morsels of exquisitely flavoured food, served over several hours on many small white plates.  Each course, which was introduced and described in great detail had its own series of dishes, including cutlery.  And when we had finished consuming these small flavoured treasures, everything was completely cleared away, right down to the white linen each time.  Then a whole new set of dishes, cutlery and food was brought back for the next course. 

Although the food was delicious, it was certainly not filling and my husband always joked when he tells friends about this experience that he had to go out for a hamburger after it was all over.  All I could think of was how glad I was that I did not have to wash all those dishes and what a great story this will be – embellished with each retelling, of course – to make up for the cost.

But just think about the detail that went into that meal.  It must have taken hours to shop for the food, not to mention those little white dishes, prepare the reduction sauces, the dessert chocolates with the gold lettering, etc.  Clearly what was needed to coordinate the whole extravaganza was a “food concept architect.” 

Ok, I did not just make up that title.  I was recently reading a weekly Vancouver newspaper which featured many articles on food, including mention of the very chef who orchestrated or rather architected the aforementioned meal.  It all made sense when I read that.  Of course, you can’t just be a “chef” anymore – especially one who “just” cooks and serves.  No, apparently some chefs have moved far beyond that.  This “food concept architect” is apparently not the only one using this title, although I must say it has not exactly caught on if you can trust a quick Google Search. 

Is this job title “food concept architect” presumptuous or does it take a certain amount of professional cachet to call oneself that?  Is it just about PR?  I’m not an expert on that, but this got me thinking about librarians, a profession to which I proudly belong.  There are plenty of qualified librarians who would prefer to be called information manager, knowledge worker or a new one I just saw advertised: Informationist, but I don’t believe I have ever heard of "information concept architect.” I ask why not?

Just think about all the wonderful, creative, intellectual tasks that librarians do.  These range from managing a budget, designing databases, searching databases, answering reference questions, supervising/managing staff, attending meetings, defending the cost of expensive resources, deciding what services to outsource, delivering the right information to the right people at the right time, etc.  I could go on and on and on. 

Do librarians not prepare and serve up information to individuals/clients/patrons just like chefs in restaurants serve up courses?  Do they not deserve the same high-falutin’ name?  Perhaps there are only a few elite chefs who can call themselves a “food concept architect” and perhaps there are also just a few librarians who could possibly qualify to call themselves “information concept architects.”  But maybe we should keep trying.  Read Alexander Feng’s essay Corporate Librarian 2.0: New Core Competencies, Bruce Rosenstein’s essay The Core Competence of Innovation or ALA’s Core Competences of Librarianship for further inspiration and participate in Align SLAto help define our profession!

Spring Training

by Denise Bonin Wednesday, January 04, 2012 11:18 PM

Baseball_clip_art_smallJust like baseball players, during Spring Training, you need to hone your skills with specialized training.  Not so you can hit a home run, catch a fly ball, or pitch a no-hitter.  As database users, searchers, and designers you need to learn the ins and outs of the program so you can score the right information in the fastest possible way and pitch it to your users in the best format.  Of course maximizing your return on investment will really score you points.

Andornot is pleased to offer another round of DB/TextWorks training sessions beginning Jan 12, 2012.  This is perfect for your New Year’s Resolution to become more proficient with the program that you probably use daily.

We are again offering a roster of Introductory, Advanced and Refresher training sessions in both January and March 2012.  See our Inmagic Training Schedule page on our website for more details.

And if you want to see which position you should play (or session you should take), check out our try-out camp quiz.

Our fall sessions were well attended and received solid endorsements in the follow-up survey with the majority of attendees indicating that they were Very Satisfied or Satisfied with all aspects of the sessions (from registration to instruction, cost, etc.).

So just like Tom Hanks yells in the movie A League of Their Own, “There is no crying in baseball”, there will be no crying following these sessions when you have all your bases covered.

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