How to sort fields and hide deleted ones when editing a DB/TextWorks version 16 textbase

by Jonathan Jacobsen Wednesday, August 02, 2017 12:05 PM

DBTextWorks version 16, released in July 2017, provides you with several great new features. This blog post is one of a series providing details of how to take advantage of these new features.

This blog post is about the changes to the textbase structure editor.

The Edit Textbase Structure > Edit Fields dialogue has two new features:

  • Sort Field List by – This feature permits you to sort the Field List by Field Name, or by Field Type.
  • Hide <Deleted> Fields – This option permits you to hide the <Deleted> items so they do not clutter up the display.

These small changes are super helpful for textbase designers. They appear in the Edit Textbase Structure > Edit fields dialogue as shown below.

Edit Fields

We usually start our databases with fields in a logical order, either alphabetic or in the case of a library catalogue, following the traditional ISBD / MARC order. But over time, fields may be added, renamed and deleted, making it hard to find one you want to work on. Previously, fields appeared in the order in which they were added in this editor, interspersed with the word Deleted for fields that have been deleted (although the field and its data is gone, an entry such as this remains in the list of fields).

These two new features, along with the larger size of this dialogue from the previous version of DB/TextWorks, makes textbase structure work that much easier. Sorting by name helps you find a known field, while sorting by type helps you work on a group of similar fields at once. Hiding Deleted fields declutters the interface so you can focus on only active fields.

Note that selecting a sort option or hiding deleted fields is a choice you need to make each time you open the field editor. It’s not saved between sessions.

If you decide you want to eliminate the Deleted fields altogether, rather than just hide them, you can recreate your database from scratch and re-import data, forms, etc. It’s not as daunting as it sounds, and Andornot would be happy to help you. This leaves a super clean database in great shape, for you, your current staff, and especially new staff who come on board.

See also our popular series of blog posts on “spring cleaning” for your textbases for more clean-up tips. And contact Andornot for a free assessment of your databases and suggestions to use them more efficiently or in new ways. We’d be happy to chat with you!

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