Don’t overlook the obvious. How to help researchers find your collections.

by Kathy Bryce Monday, March 26, 2018 4:28 PM

Reams of websites and consultants offer search engine optimization (SEO) advice and services, to help people find your content and information.  However we’ve noticed that many of our clients are missing an obvious, no cost source of referral links that would help researchers find their sites.  Have you Googled your organization or the major subjects or people that are included in your collections?  Odds on Wikipedia will often be the first source listed in Google search results for people or place names. It therefore makes sense to make sure that your content and collections are findable through Wikipedia.    Don’t neglect this opportunity to promote your material to researchers who may be unaware of your existence, and to contribute back to the Wikipedia community.

As outlined below, Wikipedia is strictly non-commercial so we cannot add content for you.

“Wikipedia is a multilingual, web-based, free-content encyclopedia project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation and based on a model of openly editable content. Wikipedia is written collaboratively by largely anonymous volunteers who write without pay. Anyone with Internet access can write and make changes to Wikipedia articles, except in limited cases where editing is restricted to prevent disruption or vandalism. Users can contribute anonymously, under a pseudonym, or, if they choose to, with their real identity.”

We recommend you read the Guide to Contributing first before you get started.

  • Determine if there are any links from Wikipedia to your website. Go to https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Special:LinkSearch&target= and enter the URL of your site.
  • Check to see if your parent organization has a page. Maybe a link to your site or more information on the scope of your collection on their page would be adequate, and they can be asked to add this link for you.
  • Consider adding a link on existing Wikipedia entries for significant people, organizations or places that are well represented in your collection, and are therefore a useful source of information for researchers. If your collections management system offers permalinks, you can add the URL to a fonds level descriptive record or finding aid under either the External links or References section. This requires only minimal knowledge of the formatting in the wiki markup language.
  • Add a new page if nothing exists on a person or topic already.  You will need to check first that it meets the Wikipedia tests for notability, i.e. how the editors decide whether a given topic warrants its own article, and follow the content protocols and editing guidelines

To add more detailed content, check out the Wikipedia tutorial or watch their YouTube videos. There is also a useful video from the Archives Association of Ontario created specifically as an overview of the ways in which archivists can use Wikipedia to link to their online resources.  The page List of Archives in Canada shows how many of these archives do not yet have a specific entry. Check out the page for the Canadian Lesbian and Gay Archives for a good example to look at for possible content ideas.

Please contact us if you would like help with more general tips to help users find your content.

Tags: Archives

Library and Archives Canada announces launch of 2018 funding cycle for Documentary Heritage Communities Program

by Jonathan Jacobsen Sunday, December 03, 2017 4:45 PM

Library and Archives Canada has announced the launch of the 2018 funding cycle for the Documentary Heritage Communities Program (DHCP). This is the fourth year of a planned 5 year program, with $1.5 million available this year, as in previous rounds.

The DHCP provides financial assistance to the Canadian documentary heritage community for activities that:

  • increase access to, and awareness of, Canada’s local documentary heritage institutions and their holdings; and
  • increase the capacity of local documentary heritage institutions to better sustain and preserve Canada’s documentary heritage.

The deadline for submitting completed application packages is February 7, 2018. 

This program is a great opportunity for archives, museums, historical societies and other cultural institutions to digitize their collections, develop search engines and virtual exhibits, and other activities that preserve and promote their valuable resources.

The program is aimed at non-governmental organizations specifically, including:

  • Archives; 
  • Privately funded libraries; 
  • Historical societies;              
  • Genealogical organizations/societies;  
  • Professional Associations; and 
  • Museums with an archival component.

Businesses, government and government institution (including municipal governments and Crown Corporations), museums without archives, and universities and colleges are not eligible.

Types of projects which would be considered for funding include:

  • Conversion and digitization for access purposes; 
  • Conservation and preservation treatment; 
  • The development (research, design and production) of virtual and physical exhibitions, including travelling exhibits; 
  • Conversion and digitization for preservation purposes; 
  • Increased digital preservation capacity (excluding digital infrastructure related to day-to-day activities); 
  • Training and workshops that improve competencies and build capacity; and 
  • Development of standards, performance and other measurement activities. 
  • Collection, cataloguing and access based management; and 
  • Commemorative projects.

Further program details, requirements  and application procedures are available at http://www.bac-lac.gc.ca/eng/services/documentary-heritage-communities-program/Pages/dhcp-portal.aspx

How can Andornot help?

Many Andornot clients have obtained DHCP grants in previous rounds, and Andornot has worked on many other projects which would qualify for this grant. Some examples are detailed in these blog posts:

We have extensive experience with digitizing documents, books and audio and video materials, and developing systems to manage those collections and make them searchable or presented in virtual exhibits.

Contact us to discuss collections you have and ideas for proposals. We'll do our best to help you obtain funding from the DHCP program!

Arnprior Archives' Virtual Exhibit: 150 Years of Living Off the Land

by Jonathan Jacobsen Thursday, August 10, 2017 5:27 PM

As part of the country-wide celebrations of Canada's 150th birthday, the Arnprior & McNab/Braeside Archives undertook a project to celebrate 150 years of local agriculture, harvesting, production and similar activities in their area. Entitled "150 Years of Living Off the Land", the project involved research and extensive interviews with McNab/Braeside families who are producing maple syrup, honey, alpaca wool products, and vegetables, from large to very small scale producers.

The results were assembled into a virtual and physical exhibit that explores the connection between what settlers produced in the early days in the Township and what local producers are making today. Living successfully off the land means different things today than it did before confederation. 

"Learning that many years ago there was a cheese factory in Glasgow Station, not far from the current Municipal Hall, is information not many remember. Archives are the windows to our past which created the present and future." -- Tom Peckett - Mayor of McNab Braeside

The exhibit is available at https://www.adarchives.org/exhibits/150-years-of-living-off-the-land/

[A page in the exhibit with photos, quotes, interview clips and transcripts.]

The initial reaction from the community has been very positive, with comments in a guest book such as "fabulous, neat work, thanks!" and "great exhibit - very interesting".

Andornot worked with archives staff to provide a web application for mounting the virtual exhibit. Using the Umbraco Content Management System, we developed page layouts, colour choices, and features to play back the recorded interviews, all within the existing archives website.

This system may be used by the archives for more exhibits in the future, by re-using the page layouts and other work done for this project.

[The project team at the launch on Canada Day of "150 Years of Living Off the Land". From left to right: Ella Hartwick, Laurie Dougherty, Matt Regan and Dianne Brearley.]

Andornot offers a variety of options for mounting virtual exhibits, using Umbraco or the Omeka system available through our Digital History Hub site. Contact us with your ideas for an exhibit and we'll help you choose the right system and walk you through getting it going.

Surveyor Geotagging Tool from the New York Public Library

by Kathy Bryce Monday, July 24, 2017 9:42 AM

Determining the exact location of historical photos is always a challenge, but Surveyor, a new open source tool just released by the New York Public Library (NYPL) offers a neat crowdsourcing option.  It was developed to help address the problem of photos with very general titles, or only a street name or neighbourhood, some of which may no longer exist.

The NYPL has uploaded a set of photos and users can click through and move the map until the marker is in the correct location. There is an optional step of noting the direction and angle of the view of the image.

image

This project is part of the New York City Space/Time Directory to create open source tools to help other cities, libraries and individuals to map and explore history.

Let us know if you’d be interested in adding a crowdsourcing project like this to your site. Crowdsourcing is a great way to encourage community involvement as well as enhancing the information about items in your collection. Contact Andornot to discuss possibilities!

Richmond Archives Adds Name Origins Resource to Online Search

by Jonathan Jacobsen Tuesday, June 06, 2017 9:51 AM

I live in Richmond, part of the Metro Vancouver Regional District, and have an interest in local history, so I was particularly interested when Andornot was asked by the City of Richmond Archives to help with a project on the origins of Richmond place names. 

The City of Richmond Archives is a long time user of Inmagic DB/TextWorks for managing their collections, and were instrumental in developing the set of linked databases that became our Andornot Archives Starter Kit. Over the past couple years we’ve helped the Archives upgrade their Inmagic WebPublisher-based online search system, which is available at http://archives.richmond.ca/archives/descriptions/ 

The new Name Origins search, available at http://archives.richmond.ca/archives/places/ features almost 500 records (and growing) that document and describe the history of Richmond streets, roads, bridges, neighbourhoods, and other landmarks. It’s easy to search by keyword or by type of place, and whenever possible, a Google map of the named place is shown. This database is updated by the Friends of the Richmond Archives, volunteers with a passion for local history. Launching this new database online was made possible through the Richmond Canada 150 Community Celebration Grant Allocations. 

As I worked in the web search interface to the database, I couldn’t help but search for places in my neighbourhood and around Richmond, and become captivated by the history of them. Now community members can access this information 24-7 and learn the history behind the names of streets, areas, and landmarks in their community.

Contact Andornot for options for your Inmagic databases and for search engines and other software to make your collections accessible online.

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